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Stroke is a medical emergency. With timely treatment, the risk of death and disability from stroke can be lowered. It’s important to know the symptoms and act in time; the first 3 hours are critical, brain cells are dying.





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Stroke Risk Factors (Uncontrollable)

There are two types of stroke risk factors:

Controllable -see Prevention

Uncontrollable

Age

Family history

Gender

Heart attack

Prior stroke

Race

Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA)

My risk of stroke

 

Some risk factors are controllable while others are not. Having one or more of these risk factors does not mean you will automatically have a stroke; however it's even more important that you ask your doctor about changes you can make to prevent a stroke.

The following are risk factors that are uncontrollable.

Age

A stroke can happen to anyone at any age; however your risk of stroke does increase with age.

Although childhood stroke is rare (3 in every 100,000), a small but meaningful percentage of children do have strokes due to birth defects, infections (meningitis, encephalitis), trauma and blood disorders such as sickle cell disease.

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Family history

Stroke can run in families. Your stroke risk is greater if a parent, grandparent, sister or brother has had a stroke.

Genes play a role in stroke risk factors such as high blood pressure, heart disease, diabetes, and vascular conditions.

Sedentary lifestyle or poor eating habits within a family can possibly increase the risk for stroke.

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Gender

Stroke is more common in men than in women, however 62% more women die from stroke.

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Heart attack

If you've had a heart attack, you're at higher risk of having a stroke.

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Prior stroke

The risk of stroke for someone who has already had one is 25-40% greater than that of a person who has not.

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Race

African Americans, Hispanics and Asian/Pacific Islanders have a much higher risk of stroke than Caucasians.

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Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA)

TIA is also known as a "mini stroke", “pre stroke”, or “warning stroke”. A person who's had one or more TIAs is more likely to have a stroke than someone of the same age and sex who hasn't.

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What’s my risk of stroke?

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke has developed a worksheet to help you estimate your risk of stroke and show the benefit of risk-factor control. Working with your doctor, you can develop a strategy to lower your risk to average or even below average for your age.

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For additional information, visit:

American Stroke Association

Centers for Disease Control

National Institutes of Health - National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

National Stroke Association

Peninsula Stroke Association